10 Side-effects of Salsa and Salsa

The Dancing Chefs at Salsa and Salsa receive over ten thousand chefs per year in Cozumel, Mazatlan and Cabo San Lucas. We teach everybody the fun ins and outs of Salsa making and Salsa dancing, while enjoying free-flowing margaritas. But there are hidden side-effects behind this interactive cooking and dancing tour. And here they are…

  • You will not like margaritas made with Margarita mix


lime margarita

Back in the day that you had not been to Salsa and Salsa, you could enjoy any Margarita. But once you know what a REAL Margarita tastes like, the margarita-mix version won’t taste as good as it used to. The only solution is to buy a bottle of Tequila and Cointrea and some key limes and make your own Margaritas. TIP: teach the bartender how to make a REAL Margarita!

 

  • You won’t buy canned Salsas

salsa roja
Canned or bottled Salsas are more and more available outside Mexico. Even though it’s handy to open a can, you will find that these ketchup versions can’t compare to a Fiery Salsa Roja or Tangy Green Salsa made by the best Chef (YOU!).  TIP: roast your Salsa ingredients during the weekend and mush up your fresh Salsas in a matter of minutes.}

  • You will develop an addiction to spicy food

young chef making salsa

The world becomes a sad place without spicy food. Tabasco, Sriracha or Louisiana hot sauce become your faithful companions during meals. And the worst is that you will add more and more every time!

 

  • You will start speaking Spanish

salud CZM

“Holy Guacamole”… que pasa? After visiting Salsa and Salsa you will speak and toast like a true Mexican: Salud, Dinero y mucho mucho amor! And apart of Hola and Adios, you will use words like ‘Cerveza’, ‘Baño’ and ‘Gracias’.

 

  • You will recognize strange kinds of food

Mexican grocery items

The vegetable section of your Mexican grocery store will all of a sudden look familiar. Green tomatoes, serranos, jicama and guavas will become part of your daily diet and you will know the difference between cilantro and flat-leaf parsley.

  • Your body will move in strange ways

Salsa moves

Gone are the days that you could listen to Salsa music and stand still. Now you will find your body moving in ways you previously thought impossible and you will mumble to yourself….Sea-side, bar-side……

 

  • You will shout out  ‘Olé’ on unexpected moments

Even your well-behaved self will relapse into ‘Salsa-mode’ occasionally and you will blurt out ‘Olé’. This will cause your family, friends or co-workers to wonder what’s going on and you will have to explain the reason why.

 

  • You will know what a ‘molcajete’ is and use it too

making salsa verde

The Mexican mortar (a.k.a. ‘Molcajete’: Mohl-cah-HE-te) will become a tool you recognize and use. The secret to a perfect Salsa lies in the Mexican mortar and mushing skills of the chef. TIP: Use the press-and-roll for a perfect consistency  😉

  • You will brag about your Salsas

the BEST Salsa

You will display a certain level of arrogance regarding your Salsas. You will disdain any bottled Salsas served at parties and argue with other chefs about how to make the BEST Salsa: more/less cilantro, more/less salt, more/less lime, roasted/boiled ingredients, etc.

 

  • You will go back to Mexico for a refresher class at Salsa and Salsa

welcome back Dancing Chefs

This last danger is imminent from the moment you leave the Salsa and Salsa tour. You will look at the photos from your holidays in Mexico and automatically book your next cruise or stay. Even up to 1 1/2 years ahead of time. TIP: to mitigate these symptoms, take your recipe sheet and dice up a Pico de Gallo.

 

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Shout out for Mexican Independence Day

viva mexicoIn Mexico we love to cheer: Olé….. Salud…… Ándale….. Ay ay ay! In September there’s another great occasion to cheer: Mexico’s Independence day. Now don’t get confused with Cinco de Mayo, which is sometimes mistaken for independence day. The Dancing Chefs love to cheer: Viva Mexico! Independence Day is celebrated every September 16th with parades, festivals, feasts, parties and more. Mexican flags are everywhere and the main plaza in Mexico City is packed. But what’s the history behind the date of September 16?

Back in 1810 the Spanish were the official rulers of Mexico, but many Mexicans weren’t happy with how they governed. On September 16th 1810 Father Miguel Hidalgo rang the church bells of Dolores and made a speech, now known as ‘Cry of Dolores’ or ‘Grito de Dolores’. He made a shocking announcement: he was taking up arms against the tyrannies of the Spanish government and his parishioners were all invited to join him. Within hours Hidalgo had an army: a large, unruly, poorly armed but resolute mob.

independence day dishesEvery year, local mayors and politicians re-enact the famous Grito de Dolores. In Mexico City, thousands congregate in the Zócalo, or main square, on the night of the 15th to hear the President ring the same bell that Hidalgo did and recite the Grito de Dolores. The crowd roars, cheers and chants, and fireworks light up the sky. On the 16th, every city and town all over Mexico celebrates with parades, dances and other civic festivals.

Most Mexicans celebrate by hanging flags all over their home and spending time with family. A feast is usually involved. If the food can be made red, white and green (like the Mexican Flag) all the better! Favorite dishes include Chiles en Nogada, Tostadas or Pozole. Pozole is a delicious soup filled with hominy corn and pork meat and garnished with lettuce, onion, herbs and tostadas. For all you chefs, who want to celebrate Mexican Independence Day in style and make Pozole at home: here is the recipe!!!

Pozole-RojoPozole 

 

The stock:

4 litres of water

1 kilo pork meat

1/2 kilo pork ribs

3 cans hominy corn (450gr. each)

1 onion, quartered

8 cloves of garlic

Salt to taste

 

The Sauce:

5 dried Chili Anchos, cleaned without seeds

5 dried Chili Guajillo, cleaned without seeds

6 cloves of garlic

1 onion, diced

2 tbsp vegetable oil

1/2 tsp oregano

Salt to taste

 

garnishes-for-pozoleThe Garnish:

1 Romaine lettuce, washed and shredded

1 1/2 cup onion, diced

1 1/2 cup radishes, washed and sliced

Chile Piquin, to season

Oregano, to season

Tostadas, 2-3 per person

Limes, cut in halves

 

Preparation:

  1. Heat 4 litres of water in a big pan. Add the quartered onion, garlic, salt, pork meat and ribs. Bring to a boil and lower the heat to simmer for about 2 hours or until the meat has been cooked. You can remove any foam that is formed on the soup. If neccesary you can add more water.
  2. Take the meat out of the stock. Remove excess grease, bones of the ribs, onion and garlic.
  3. Now to prepare the sauce, soak the chili ancho and guajillo in enough hot water to cover the chilis. Leave for 25 minutes.
  4. Once the chilis are softened, drain and place into a blender with the raw garlic, diced onion and oregano. Add a little bit of water too. Blend until you obtain a smooth consistency.
  5. Heat the oil in a skillet on medium high fire. Add the chili mixture to the skillet and season to taste, continuously stirring. Lower the heat and leave to simmer for about 25 minutes.
  6. Pass the chili sauce through a strainer into the stock. Bring to a boil and add the meat, simmer for another 10 minutes. Add the hominy corn, season with salt and pepper if needed. Heat through until the soup is completely hot.
  7. Serve the Pozole in a big soup bowl and place the garnish in the center of the table, so everybody can serve themselves.

 

Buen Provecho and Viva Mexico!!!

 

Dancing Chef Maaike

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