Spice it up! – Mexico’s spiciest party snacks

Dancing Chef cristina likes it hotThere is something about eating spicy food that is down-right addictive. Even though you feel that your tongue is on fire, you can’t feel your lips and you’ve broken out in a sweat, you will continue to crave spicy food! Mexico has a huge variety of dishes that involve chilis: ranging from the mild Poblano or Pasilla chili to the fiery Habanero. The spiciness of a chili is due to the natural active component ‘Capsaicin’ and it’s measured in Scoville Heat Units. Eating spicy food is not a competition though: we love to still be able to taste the flavor of our food, without our taste buds being blown out.

chile-peppers-hottness-for-blog1

 

If this chart hasn’t scared you, you’re a true Hot Chef as we call them at Salsa and Salsa. It’s time to bring out Mexico’s spiciest snacks that you can prepare for  a Mexican party at home or just as a side-dish to spice up your meals.

Stuffed Jalapeño peppers

This is the spicy brother of a well-known Mexican dish “Chile Relleno”. This breaded Jalapeño chili is bursting with flavor and will be the star of the party.chiles-rellenos-300x204

  • Oil to fry
  • 20 Jalapeño chilis
  • 1 1/2 litres water
  • 1/4 cup vinegar
  • 1 tbsp salt
  • 1 package cream cheese
  • 1/2 cup white flour
  • 1 egg, slightly beaten
  • 200 grams grated Parmesan cheese

Heat the oil in a deep skillet until smoking hot.  Put the chilis, one by one, into the hot oil for about 10 seconds. Use kitchen tongs to turn around and fry evenly. Submerge into cold water to cool down and make it easier to remove the skin.

Peel off the skins carefuly, using a kitchen cloth or gloves. Make sure they don’t break. Make a small cut on the side of the chili and remove the seeds and veins.

Once the chilis are clean, submerge them into a bowl with plenty of water, 1 tablespoon of salt and 1/4 cup of vinegar. Leave to rest for at least 2 hours.

Remove the chilis from the water, rinse and pat dry with paper towels. Slice the cream cheese in thin strips and fill the chilis.

Place the flour on a flat plate, the parmesan cheese on anothe plate and the egg in a cereal bowl.

Pass the chilis, one by one, through the flour, then into the egg and finally into the Parmesan cheese. You can repeat this procedure to make a double layer.

Heat oil in a deep skillet and fry the prepared chilis until golden brown. Place on paper towels to absorb the excess oil.

 

Habanero Salsa – Xnipec 

This spicy version of Pico-de-Gallo is typical from the Yucatan peninsula in the south-east of Mexico. Even if you think you don’t like spicy food, try making this with less Habanero chili. You’ll be surprised by its wonderful flavor!

  • 2 big Roma tomatoesxnipec
  • Cilantro to taste
  • 1 chile habanero
  • ½ Red onion
  • Orange juice and vinegar
  • Sal to taste

 

Dice the tomatoes, onion and habanero chile finely. You might want to use gloves when cutting the habanero. Chop the cilantro and mix with the other ingredients. Add salt, orange juice and vinegar to taste. This salsa is used for grilled meat and fish.

 

Enjoy these recipes and make sure to have plenty of Margaritas and napkins at hand!

Greetings from the Dancing Chefs at Salsa and Salsa

 

 

Shout out for Mexican Independence Day

viva mexicoIn Mexico we love to cheer: Olé….. Salud…… Ándale….. Ay ay ay! In September there’s another great occasion to cheer: Mexico’s Independence day. Now don’t get confused with Cinco de Mayo, which is sometimes mistaken for independence day. The Dancing Chefs love to cheer: Viva Mexico! Independence Day is celebrated every September 16th with parades, festivals, feasts, parties and more. Mexican flags are everywhere and the main plaza in Mexico City is packed. But what’s the history behind the date of September 16?

Back in 1810 the Spanish were the official rulers of Mexico, but many Mexicans weren’t happy with how they governed. On September 16th 1810 Father Miguel Hidalgo rang the church bells of Dolores and made a speech, now known as ‘Cry of Dolores’ or ‘Grito de Dolores’. He made a shocking announcement: he was taking up arms against the tyrannies of the Spanish government and his parishioners were all invited to join him. Within hours Hidalgo had an army: a large, unruly, poorly armed but resolute mob.

independence day dishesEvery year, local mayors and politicians re-enact the famous Grito de Dolores. In Mexico City, thousands congregate in the Zócalo, or main square, on the night of the 15th to hear the President ring the same bell that Hidalgo did and recite the Grito de Dolores. The crowd roars, cheers and chants, and fireworks light up the sky. On the 16th, every city and town all over Mexico celebrates with parades, dances and other civic festivals.

Most Mexicans celebrate by hanging flags all over their home and spending time with family. A feast is usually involved. If the food can be made red, white and green (like the Mexican Flag) all the better! Favorite dishes include Chiles en Nogada, Tostadas or Pozole. Pozole is a delicious soup filled with hominy corn and pork meat and garnished with lettuce, onion, herbs and tostadas. For all you chefs, who want to celebrate Mexican Independence Day in style and make Pozole at home: here is the recipe!!!

Pozole-RojoPozole 

 

The stock:

4 litres of water

1 kilo pork meat

1/2 kilo pork ribs

3 cans hominy corn (450gr. each)

1 onion, quartered

8 cloves of garlic

Salt to taste

 

The Sauce:

5 dried Chili Anchos, cleaned without seeds

5 dried Chili Guajillo, cleaned without seeds

6 cloves of garlic

1 onion, diced

2 tbsp vegetable oil

1/2 tsp oregano

Salt to taste

 

garnishes-for-pozoleThe Garnish:

1 Romaine lettuce, washed and shredded

1 1/2 cup onion, diced

1 1/2 cup radishes, washed and sliced

Chile Piquin, to season

Oregano, to season

Tostadas, 2-3 per person

Limes, cut in halves

 

Preparation:

  1. Heat 4 litres of water in a big pan. Add the quartered onion, garlic, salt, pork meat and ribs. Bring to a boil and lower the heat to simmer for about 2 hours or until the meat has been cooked. You can remove any foam that is formed on the soup. If neccesary you can add more water.
  2. Take the meat out of the stock. Remove excess grease, bones of the ribs, onion and garlic.
  3. Now to prepare the sauce, soak the chili ancho and guajillo in enough hot water to cover the chilis. Leave for 25 minutes.
  4. Once the chilis are softened, drain and place into a blender with the raw garlic, diced onion and oregano. Add a little bit of water too. Blend until you obtain a smooth consistency.
  5. Heat the oil in a skillet on medium high fire. Add the chili mixture to the skillet and season to taste, continuously stirring. Lower the heat and leave to simmer for about 25 minutes.
  6. Pass the chili sauce through a strainer into the stock. Bring to a boil and add the meat, simmer for another 10 minutes. Add the hominy corn, season with salt and pepper if needed. Heat through until the soup is completely hot.
  7. Serve the Pozole in a big soup bowl and place the garnish in the center of the table, so everybody can serve themselves.

 

Buen Provecho and Viva Mexico!!!

 

Dancing Chef Maaike

Hit the road, Chef!

carretera mexicoIt’s that time of year again. It’s the blissful period where school is a far-away thought on the mind of children and many parents. Some people stay at home to celebrate the 4th of July and others hit the road to visit relatives. Wherever you’re going this summer, the Dancing Chefs want you to bring Salsa and Salsa with you!

When you travel in Mexico, whether it’s by boat, bus or car, you will invariably find ‘antojitos’ on any street corner or at any bus stop. Antojitos literally translates to ‘little cravings’. It’s a variety of snacks that are quick to eat and ready to take away. Antojitos are street and market food and most are made with masa, dough made of corn flour and water.

 

antojitosThe tortilla is made of masa and serves as bread, plate and cutlery at the same time. Quickly baked on a hot griddle or comal, folded with creamy cheese in between, become a quesadilla. Tacos, soft tortillas, are served with beans, chicken, mole or Poblano chili as well as the crunchy tostadas. Thick stuffed gorditas and panuchos or sopes: their rims folded upwards to keep the filling inside or delicious enchiladas: there’s too much to choose from!

Wherever you eat antojitos, you can find gigantic containers filled with agua fresca: refreshing drinks of mixed fruits with water. Bright-green colors of limes, orange colors of melon or mango are lined up to extinguish the fire after a plate of tacos with salsa! There are two favorites that never miss: agua de tamarindo made from the sticky tamarind pods and the deep-red agua de Jamaica made from hibiscus flowers.

 

queso-fundidoQueso fundido con champiñones y chile poblano

(Melted cheese with mushrooms and poblano chili)

Queso fundido is a tasty appetizer in many Mexican restaurants world-wide. It’s usually served in shallow clay plates with soft flour tortillas. You can use Mexican chorizo too and don’t forget to prepare some spicy Red Salsa!

1 Poblano chili: roasted, skin and seeds removed, cut in slices

2 tbsp butter

Salt and pepper

2 oz. or 60 grams mushrooms, sliced

9 oz or 250 grams grated Chihuahua cheese or Monterrey Jack

10 – 12 flour tortillas

Heat 1 tablespoon of butter in a skillet and shortly fry the poblano chili slices. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and remove from skillet. Heat another tablespoon of butter in the same skillet and bake the mushrooms until softened. Also sprinkle with salt and pepper and remove from skillet.

Grease the inside of 2 cazuelitas or small oven dishes. Place half of the cheese and half of the strips of poblano chili in one dish and the other half of the cheese and half of the mushrooms in the other dish. Cover with aluminum foil and place under a broiler for about 3 minutes until the cheese has melted. Remove the aluminum foil and heat for another 2 minutes until the cheese is bubbly. Add the remaining mushrooms and chili to the dishes.

Serve warm with flour tortillas, so the cheese can be used to make tacos. This is a very tasty snacks with Pico de gallo.

SERVES 6 PEOPLE

 

 

 

It’s Taco Time – How to prepare a ‘Taquiza’

Fact: in Mexico we love to eat and especially during parties. And there is always something to celebrate: a birthday, an anniversary, a baptism or first communion or just because it’s Sunday! If you have to feed a big group of people, you need to have a lot of food and the best option is to have a ‘taquiza’. A taquiza is basically a taco party, where you choose from a variety of taco fillings to put on your (hand-made) tortillas and add copious amounts of salsa. If this sounds like the kind of party you would like to attend, keep reading…….

 

The set-up

 

agua frescaHosting a ‘taquiza’ at your house is easy to do. You need to have rectangular table and cover with a colorful table cloth. You can use a fun Mexican pattern, but a bright-colored plastic table cloth works just as well. You can have the drinks on one side of the table in big pitchers, because with all those spicy salsas you’ll sure be thirsty. You could make lemonade, fruit water (e.g. water melon water) rice water (Horchata) or hibiscus tea (Jamaica) for the designated drivers and a tasty Michelada or Margarita for the lucky adults!

 

taquiza cazuelas

 

In the center of the table you can display the taco fillings in Mexican pottery or chafing dishes to keep it warm. Have a stack of plates and warm tortillas ready for each guest to serve their own tacos. At the far end of the table you can have the Salsa bar with a variety of salsas (Red, green, Pico de gallo, etc.) as well as diced fresh onion, cilantro, radishes, limes and salt to top off your tacos.

 

 

 

The taco filling

 

You can find Taquizas in all Mexico and the taco fillings changes per region. But the most common varieties are: Rajas con crema (for recipe: see Newsletter May 2014), Chicharron (pork rinds in sauce), Mole, Frijoles refritos (refried beans), Carne asada (diced grilled beef), Cochinita Pibil (Pork in Yucatecan sauce) and Tinga de Pollo (chicken in chipotle-tomato sauce). We love to have at least one taco of each flavor….. Que rico!

 

tinga de polloTinga de Pollo:

 

  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 onion, cut in thin slices
  • ½ pound Roma tomatoes
  • 1 small can of Chipotle chili (you can add less if you don’t like it hot)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 pound boiled chicken breast, shredded

 

Heat the oil in a big skillet and fry the onion until golden brown. In the meanwhile blend the tomatoes with the chipotle chili and the salt. Add this mixture to the onions. Add the shredded chicken as well and leave to simmer for about 15 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste.

 

tortillasThe Tortillas

 

There is some controversy about what a ‘Taco’ is. In Mexico there are no hard-shell tacos and Mexican people consider this an American invention. At a taquiza the tortillas that are used, are either corn tortillas or flour tortillas. In the north of Mexico we usually use flour tortillas and in the south of Mexico corn tortillas are more common. Tortillas are at their best when they’re just made, but you buy your tortillas at the store and heat them in a dry skillet or ‘comal’. Keep them warm in a kitchen towel.

 


The Fiesta

 


Fiesta Papel PicadoOnce you have prepared all the food and drinks, it’s time to get the Fiesta started. Tropical music (salsa, cumbia, and merengue) is always a great option, as well as some fun props like maracas, Mexican sombreros or Piñatas. Let your imaginations run free and don’t forget the occasional…. Olé!

 

‘Angels’ receives help from LELA the Pig

LELA the Pig is flying all the way to Greece during February 2014. Thanks to your generous donations LELA can help out the disabled, abandoned and injured animals that “Angels Animal Shelter” takes in. Here is their story: 

Hand & Paw

Angels”-  Shelter & emergency care for disabled, wounded & abandoned animals

“Angels”: because the village where we live is called ANGELOCHORI, which literally means “Place of the Angels”…

We are just a (single) mom and her daughter doing this voluntary work. We love animals. Unfortunately in Greece there is no (state or municipal) funding available for shelters or organizations that take care of these emergency strays…  So you can imagine that with so many animals all my salary goes into their care.

Our shelter currently hosts 15 dogs and 7 cats, all of whom have either health problems or are too old to be placed out in families. And besides these 22 permanent residents, we also take care of any other animal that is wounded/hurt/abandoned/ etc. etc. and needs temporary healthcare and shelter. Of course we also take in other strays for whom we try to find permanent or foster homes.  We are able to place most of the young(er) dogs that come in either in foster care after they get well or we find them permanent families (“FUR”-ever homes) – mostly abroad. We have treated birds (owls, ravens, pigeons, etc.) but also hedgehogs and turtles. In our (Greek) village they call us the “crazy Dutch”, but whoever of our co-villagers – AND BEYOND our village –  have a problem with an animal – or finds an injured or a stray animal, they call us right away (even if it is in the middle of the night (or they just “dump” them in our garden as they know where we live).

My small car turns into an animal ambulance WAY TOO OFTEN ! And my veterinarian doctor who has become a real good friend over the past 8,5 years is always there to help…

It so happens that our vet also consults us on problems with animals and it has happened that we had to turn our living room into a clinic to tend to an operated dog around the clock because her veterinary clinic couldn’t handle the intensive care that animal would need.  We sometimes have drips hanging from a clothes hanger to the curtain railing in our living room, cleaning wounds, administering shots and providing intensive care to very serious cases.

Of the 15 dogs we take care of right now, 4 are heavily handicapped (2 dogs with 3 legs, 1 dog with paralysis of her hind legs and 1 huge dog who is in need of an operation to redress his severe hip and knee dysplasia on both hind legs…) and 3 have permanent health problems for which they need to take medication for the rest of their lives. That leaves us with 7 dogs with major health issues and 8 dogs that are quite healthy but so old that nobody wants to adopt them anymore. Most of these 8 ‘healthy’ residents were previously abandoned by their previous owners and found on the road (some of them hit by cars, but managed to get better in the meantime).

Of the 7 cats we have 2 cats with serious health problems… 1 female called Sahara (her fur skin has the color of the Sahara desert) because she is spastic and a male called Paul who is almost 13 years old and has diabetes. Leonie gives him 2 shots of insulin a day.  We took Paul in with his “brother” Oscar almost a month ago. They belonged to a colleague at work who died of cancer last  October. Both Oscar and Paul had no place to go (who wants old cats – especially if one needs to get shots twice a day for his diabetes problem?) Greece is a very tough place for animals…. It’s heart breaking what we have to deal with most of the time….

All the animals that we have are under constant veterinary care. And that costs a heap of money.

Now, with the winter in full bloom we need to be able to provide our animals (plus all the extra ones that come and go) with dog beds and blankets to keep them warm. I need to refurbish a place – or if possible build a new shed – for the “intensive care unit” outside my house in the garden with infra-red lamps that give off heat. I need to be able to keep on providing stray animals with anti-rabies vaccinations (rabies has returned to Greece after an absence of almost 100 years)….

There is always SOOOOO MUCH to do, that I can’t begin to even describe it.

Thank you sooooo very much for helping us in February.

Lots of love to all of you !

Eleonore & Leonie

Mexican winter drinks – Ponche mexicano

ponche-navidenoThis warm winter beverage is a great option for the holiday season.  Ponche is usually served at Posadas in Mexico, starting on December 16th until Christmas Eve. Around these days, there’s lots of fun for all. Children enjoy their piñatas in star-shape and adults have this warm drink (maybe even with a shot of rum or brandy…. LOL!)

Ponche has lots vitamins, because of the fruits and it’s a healthy and delicious Mexican tradition. This recipe serves 10 people, so make it when you’re having a winter Salsa party. You can also keep it in the refrigerator for 7 days.

 

What do you need?

 

  • Ponche ingredients½ kilo of Tejocotes
  • ½ kilo of Guayabas (Guavas)
  • ¼ kilo of dried prunes or big raisins
  • 5 apples
  • 4 sugar cane sticks (if available)
  • ¼ kilo of peeled tamarind pods
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • ¾ kilo sugar
  • 100 grams of Piloncillo (raw cane sugar)
  • 50 grams of dried Jamaica flowers

 

How do you make Ponche?

First bring to a boil 5 liters or 10 cups of water in a big pan. Add the sugar, piloncillo and cinnamon when the water is boiling. In the meanwhile wash and cut the fruit. The tejocotes look like little apples and should be cut in half. The other fruit should be cut in 4 pieces. Peel the sugar cane (this is a little difficult) and cut in pieces of 15 centimeter.

First add the tejocotes and the sugar cane to the pan. Leave to boil for about 5 minutes. Then add the remaining ingredients and simmer for about 30 minutes. Make sure to check that the apples aren’t over-cooked.

You can serve Ponche in big mugs and make sure to add a small piece of sugar cane to each serving.

Felices Fiestas!!!!

From the mountains to the sea: the journey of Dancing Chef Haley

dancing chef HaleyI have always thought of life as an adventure, so when I decided I wanted to do something outside of what most 19 year old college students do, everyone that knows me was not surprised. This summer I decided I wanted to do something different, so I moved to the island of Cozumel Mexico and become a Dancing Chef for the famous Salsa and Salsa tour (aka best summer job ever).

I was born in the mountainous state of Colorado. I get my adventurous side from my family, because when I was in 2nd grade, seeking adventure, my family decided to move to the sunny island of Cozumel, Mexico. I attended a bilingual school, so I am fluent in both English and Spanish. I lived in various parts of Mexico for 10 years including Cancun & Mazatlán. Growing up in a different culture gave me an exclusive view on life and I am always eager to meet people from all over the world and hear their unique stories. I recently moved back to the United States for college. I am currently double majoring in Restaurant, Food, Beverage Management and International Hotel & Tourism Management.

dancing chef haley with guestWhen I joined the Salsa & Salsa team this summer in Cozumel as a dancing chef, I didn’t know what to expect. I had done my research on the show and the company before moving down to the island for 3 months, and from what I could tell, everyone who had ever attended the Salsa & Salsa show had loved it so I was excited. This job was not only a fun summer job where I could live the island life in paradise, but also a learning experience. Customer service is a huge part of the hospitality industry and working for Salsa and Salsa, I got the hands on experience that cannot be taught at school.

My first day meeting my fellow coworkers, I realized I was walking into a family. From day one, they made me feel like I belonged. How many people can say that after their first day in a new job, in a different country and speaking a foreign language?! I felt like the luckiest girl in the world. I realized working as a dancing chef that you need to treat every day as a new experience because you never know who will walk through your door.

Working for Salsa & Salsa this summer not only taught me the important things in the hospitality industry, such as: working on my personal skills with clients, learning how to do inventory, helping out in the kitchen and seeing what it actually takes to run Salsa& Salsa on a business standpoint, but also fun things like:

  1. I can’t Salsa dance to save my life, but I will have a blast trying and making up new moves of my own with my awesome dance partners.
  2. People can get very creative and involve a lot of “Styling”, as us dancing chefs like to call it when it comes to salsa dancing
  3. You truly can change anyone’s day with a smile (and maybe a couple margaritas 😉 )
  4. Tomatillos are actually from the goose berry family
  5. I will never go back to the old red roma tomato, white onion guacamole ever again

dancing chef haley with group photoThis summer has definitely been an amazing experience not only as being a stepping stone in my career and future, but learning a lot about myself as well. You never know what might happen, and even though you might be given the same show day in and day out, every day and every person walking through our gate is different, and I love the diversity. “The biggest adventure you can ever take is to live the life of your dreams.” – Oprah Winfrey

Con mucho mucho amor,

Dancing Chef at heart, Haley Saul.

The Dancing Chefs show off their tools!

dancing chef amandaMexico’s most patriotic month of the year has started.  So it’s time to dust off your big ‘Sombrero’, take out the tequila and get ready Mexico’s Independence Day on September 15th.  But before you start gulping down those shots of tequila, you should have at least a solid base of home-made Mexican food in your stomach. You know…. Just in case!

When you walk into a kitchen in Mexico, you will find several cooking tools that might look unfamiliar to you. However to make the best Mexican food, you need the best tools. To help you figure out what to use, here’s an easy guide from the Dancing Chefs:

molcajete

 

Molcajete:

We’re going to start off easy. If you have been at Salsa and Salsa, you have hands-on experience with the Mexican mortar. It’s made from lava stone or clay and it is used to grind spices and ingredients to make Salsa!

comal-tortillas

 

Comal:

You might have seen this utensil in hole-in-the-wall restaurants. It’s a round baking sheet or griddle, made of stoneware or iron. The Comal is heated on the stove top or directly on a fire to bake or reheat tortillas. It’s quite an art to bake tortillas and not burn your fingers when you have to turn them over! If you can’t find a Comal, you can use a dry skillet instead.

cazuela

 

Cazuela:

This traditional earthenware casserole only has been glazed on the inside. The Cazuela is perfect to make Moles and stews, because it heats evenly and stay warm for a long time. When you buy a new Cazuela you have to make it ready for use. To do this, rub the inside with a fresh clove of garlic, fill the cazuela with cold water and leave to boil dry. Repeat this process several times and then rinse with some water and soap.

molinillo

 

Molinillo:

The name of this tool literally means ‘hand mill’. It is a wooden, carved whisk to make hot chocolate. Mexican chocolate is a mixture of ground cocoa, sugar and cinnamon, pressed together into chocolate bars. The loose wooden rings at the top make sure that the hot chocolate become nice and foamy. To use the Molinillo you have to hold it between two hands and twist back and forth to make the whisk movement.

metate y mano

 

 

 

Metate y Mano:

This ancient tool is made of lava stone and has a wide rolling pin, with which you grind corn, chilies, cocoa beans and other ingredients. Indigenous chefs kneel on the ground,

true to tradition and roll the round Mano over the Metate. The ground ingredients are collected on the lower end of the Metate.

Mexican Margaritas from the Dancing Chefs

dancing chef stephanie Margaritas are a very typical drink from Mexico and that of course is because its base is TEQUILA!!!!  As you probably know,  you can make margaritas of any flavor, but the key to a delicious margarita is to use fresh ingredients and high quality alcohol.

As a true Dancing Chef, I love to experiment with new flavors that the bartenders, or “cantineros” as we like to call them, come up with. There are some very strange margarita flavors, like: Avocado, Cucumber-Jalapeño and Banana-Peanut Butter. These flavors are really popular among people that LOVE those vegetables or the particular sweetness of peanut butter.

The most popular margaritas are: Lime, Strawberry, Pineapple, Mango and Tamarind. You are probably wondering what tamarind is. Well, not only is it my favorite flavor of margarita, but it is also a very common pod-like fruit which is used extensively around the world.

tamarindo

In Mexico, it is used in sauces or sold in various snack forms: candied, in sweet soft clusters, or dried and salted. It is also prepared as a fresh beverage called Agua de Tamarindo, or as a cocktail Margarita de Tamarindo. Often in Mexico tamarind is plucked off the tree and eaten raw.

Tamarind has a sour flavor that goes perfect with either chili or sugar. Make sure that on your next trip to Mexico you try tamarind in the different ways it is prepared.

HOME MADE TAMARIND SYRUP

15 fresh tamarinds

1/3 cup of sugar

3 cups of water

Peel the tamarind pods and put them in a small pot with 3 cups of water. Let them boil for about 15 minutes and add the sugar. Mix it up and let it cool down. When it’s room temperature, get ready to squeeze! Wash your hands thoroughly and get them in the pot, squeezing the tamarind so the seeds pop out and remove them. Pour the seedless mix into a blender and blend until is smooth.  You just finished your home-made tamarind syrup!!! This can often be used for Tamarind water or a Tamarind Margarita.

Tamarind syrup

TAMARIND MARGARITA

1 cup of home-made tamarind syrup

4 oz of tequila

4 oz of orange liqueur

2 limes

2 cups of ice

Chili powder or Salt to rim the glasses

Here we are going to make Tamarind Margaritas. Pour 1 cup of your home-made tamarind syrup,  4 oz of tequila, and 4 oz of orange liqueur in the blender , and squeeze in the juice of two limes. Add 2 cups of ice and blend! Your margarita is ready to pour into your glass, but make sure you rim your glass with lime and then with chili powder  (you can subtitute salt for chili powder). Once the glass is ready, pour in the margarita. You can garnish with a slice of lime or jicama if you’d like.

Now you only need to raise your glass and toast in Salsa and Salsa style: Salud, Dinero y mucho mucho Amor!!!

Margarita tamarindo

Salsa sea delicacy: Shrimp Ceviche

barco camaroneroCeviche is a refreshing dish based on fresh fish or shrimp marinated in lime juice. You can find many different styles on the American continent, from Peru to Mexico. This Ceviche recipe is typical from Sinaloa, the shrimp capital of Latin America. The tastiest Ceviche is made with fresh shrimp, but you can make it with frozen shrimps too.

Ingredients

2,20 lbs or 1 kg of peeled shrimp

1 cucumber, peeled

1 or 2 Roma tomatoes

½ red or white onion

1 or 2 Serrano chillies

½ cup lime juice

Cilantro to taste

Salt and pepper to taste

ceviche sinaloensePreparation:

Cut the peeled shrimp in pieces and add to a bowl with the lime juice, salt and pepper. Cover and leave to marinate in the fridge for about 10 minutes.
In the meanwhile, cut in cubes the cucumber, tomatoes, red onion and the Serrano chillies. Make sure to remove the seeds from the cucumber, tomatoes and chillies. Chop the cilantro finely.

Take the shrimp from the fridge and drain the lime juice. Then add the chopped ingredients and add extra salt and pepper to taste. If you like a very sour Ceviche you can add extra lime juice.
Serve this Ceviche with ‘tostadas’ or salty crackers.

Provecho’ (= Bon Appetit)

* NOTE: if you want to make a fish Ceviche, add the same ingredients and strips of fresh firm fish.

 

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑