Meet Dancing Chef Linda!


linda mel

Dancing Chef: Linda

Do you have a nickname? Moringa-linda. I make recipes with the little green leaves of the moringa oliefera tree 🙂


Which city were you born? Near Toronto, Ontario

What’s your favorite recipe to make? Red lentil coconut curry lemongrass veggie soup 

Favorite meal to eat? Sushi

Favorite snacks? Raw carrots & hummus

How spicy do you like your salsa? 2 full chilies w all the seeds!

Any pets? 4 dogs


Hobbies? Gardening, gardening, & more gardening! Creating no-bake healthy recipes. Snorkeling and biking too!

Can you share something fun about yourself? I came to Cozumel on vacation Feb. 1998… And I’m still here, enjoying  my new role as a Dancing Chef!!!



What’s in a guac? The Dancing Chefs’ favorite guacamole recipes

Guacamole is an avocado-based dip or salad first created by the Aztecs in Mexico. It’s so popular that it has passed beyond Mexican borders and has also become part of American cuisine as a dip or side dish. Avocado is incredibly nutritious, because it contains Vitamin B6, C and E as well as healthy fats. This makes you feel satiated without adding too many calories. Add new flavors to your kitchen: pull out the Salsa and Salsa recipe sheet or try one of these tasty recipes.

DANCING CHEF TIP: When you make a guacamole, make sure to leave the seed of the avocado in the serving bowl. This will help that the guacamole doesn’t turn brown. You can also add a couple drops of lime juice.

Classic Guacamole1

  • 2 ripe avocados
  • ¼ cup diced Roma tomatoes
  • ½ tbsp. diced Serrano chili
  • ¼ cup onion, diced
  • 2 tbsp. cilantro, chopped
  • Salt and lime to taste

Score the avocado all around with a knife and open. Remove the seed. Take out the pulp with a spoon and mush in molcajete. Add the tomato, chili, onion and cilantro and mush together. Add salt and a few drops of lime juice to taste.

Tropical Guacamole


  • 1 ripe mango, peeled and diced in cubes
  • ¼ cup jicama or radish, peeled and diced in cubes
  • ¼ cup red onion, diced finely
  • ¼ tsp garlic, peeled and diced finely
  • 2 tbsp. lime juice
  • 2 ripe avocados
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Optional: 2 tbsp. pomegranate seeds

In a bowl, combine the mango, jicama, onion, garlic, lime juice, salt and pepper. Set aside. Score the avocados all around, down to the seed. Twist and open. Remove the seed and take out the avocado. Mush in a molcajete until softened and add the other ingredients. Taste and adjust the salt.

You can decorate the guacamole with pomegranate seeds and serve with tortilla chips.


Crunchy Guacamole

  • 2 ripe avocados
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp garlic, finely diced
  • ½ cup guayabas (guavas), diced without seeds
  • ½ cup peach, diced without seed
  • 1 cup cucumber, peeled and diced without seeds
  • ¼ cup onion, finely diced
  • ¼ cup cilantro, diced

Remove the pulp from the avocado with a spoon. Mush the avocado in the molcajete with the salt and garlic. Add the guayaba, peach, cucumber, onion and cilantro. Mix well and season to taste.


Poblano chili Guacamole

  • 2 Poblano chilies
  • 2 ripe avocados
  • ½ cup onion, finely diced
  • ½ cup cilantro, diced
  • 2 Roma tomatoes, diced
  • Lime and salt to taste

Open the avocados and place the pulp into a molcajete. Mush into a paste, add a couple drops of lime juice and set aside.

Roast the Poblano chilies over an open flame until charred. You can also roast them in the oven for 25 minutes. Remove the skin and seeds and cut into small strips. Roast the tomatoes in the same way; remove skin and seeds and dice into small pieces. Add the roasted Poblano chilies, roasted tomatoes, onion and cilantro to the molcajete and incorporate with the avocado. Season to taste.


‘Mexicanissimo’ Guacamole



  • 2 ripe avocados
  • 2 Guajillo chilies, seeds removed, cut in strips
  • 3 strips bacon
  • 1 cup Nopales (cactus leaves), cooked and diced
  • 1 cup onion, diced
  • ½ cup cilantro, diced
  • Salt and lime to taste


Cut the bacon into small strips and fry until crunchy. Set aside. Heat oil in a skillet and fry the Chile Guajillo strips for 30 seconds. Set aside to cool down.

Open the avocados and place the pulp into a molcajete. Mush well and add a few drops of lime juice. Add the bacon strips, Guajillo chili, Nopales, onion and cilantro to the molcajete and mix well. You can adjust the seasoning with salt and lime.

All you need to know about a Mexican barbeque

The time is here to chill and grill. Summer is the perfect moment to spend time outside with your family and friends, firing up the barbecue. What about pulling out your Salsa and Salsa recipe sheet to make a spicy salsa roja or tangy salsa verde? Grill the ingredients and have your molcajete at hand to catch those flavors and spice up the afternoon. In Mexico a barbeque is called  ‘carne asada’, which translates as grilled meat. But it’s so much more than that. Join the party and find out how the Dancing Chefs grill.


You can’t start the party without some proper hydration. Whether you like margaritas on-the-rocks or beer (click here for our beer cocktail recipe) make sure to have a cooler at hand. For our smaller chefs we love to prepare this double-red fruit water.

Agua de sandia con fresa2

  • 2 cups watermelon chopped
  • 1 cup strawberries, hulled
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 lime
  • Sugar to taste

Put the watermelon in a blender with 1/2 cup water. Blend well and strain out the seeds through a sieve. Place the liquid back into the blender. Add the strawberries, juice of 1 lime, water and sugar to taste. Blend again until smooth. Serve with ice cubes.


When it comes to meat, it’s all about prepping and marinating. We love to use ‘arrachera’ (beef flank steak) but you could also get a nice rib-eye instead.

2Carne asada

  • 2 pounds beef flank steak, sliced
  • 1/2 cup pineapple, diced
  • 1 Mexican beer, e.g. Corona or Sol
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Season the meat with salt and pepper and place in a non-metal bowl. Blend the pineapple until smooth and pour over the meat. Add the beer and mix well. Make sure that all the meat is coated with the pineapple-beer mixture. Cover with plastic wrap and leave to marinade for 1 hour. In the meanwhile start the fire and have a drink….


There are so many options to serve as sides for a Mexican barbeque. The basics are grilled nopal leaves and spring onions, grilling together with the meat. We also love to eat seasoned bean soup (‘Frijoles charros’) while waiting for the meat. Another great option is the stuffed Poblano chili. You slit the Poblano chili open on one side, fill with Chihuahua cheese and close with a wooden toothpick. Then put it on the grill until charred on all sides. But our all-time favorite are grilled veggies on a skewer.

Alambre de verduras

Chicken or turkey kebabs

  • 1/2 cup pineapple, 1-inch cubes
  • 1/2 cup red onion, 1-inch chunks
  • 1/2 cup bell pepper, 1-inch cubes
  • 1/2 cup zucchini, 1-inch cubes
  • Bacon, cut in squares

Soak long wooden skewers in water. Then insert 1 piece of pineapple, onion, bell pepper and bacon onto the skewer and repeat the process until the skewer has filled up. Make sure to leave some space to hold the skewer. You could add chicken or shrimp too. Place onto the grill and turn until lightly charred on all sides.


It takes a while to prepare but it’s worth the effort. This world-famous Mexican dessert goes back to the days of the Conquistadores, when milk and eggs were introduced by the Spanish. Custards are popular in many kitchens around the world, but Flan has a characteristic caramel cover. Put a modern twist to this basic recipe, by adding 2 tbsp instant coffee and 2 tbsp coffee liquor.

1Flan – Mexican Caramel pudding

  • 300 grams sugar
  • 4 cups milk
  • 1 tsp vanilla essence
  • Pinch of salt
  • 4 eggs
  • 3 egg yolks
  • 1 ½ tsp corn starch
  • 1 tbsp cold water

Heat the oven at 180°C or 375°F. Heat half the sugar, in a sauce pan with a thick bottom, on low heat. Move the pan continuously until the sugar melts and caramelizes golden-brown. Pour the caramel in a round cake shape, holding at least 3 cups. Turn the shape around until the caramel covers the whole bottom, set aside.

Mix the remaining sugar with the milk, vanilla and salt in another sauce pan. Bring to a boil and leave to simmer for at least 10 minutes. The mixture should boil down to at least half. Cover and set aside.Whisk the eggs and egg yolks in a big bowl. Mix the corn starch and water until a smooth paste and add to the eggs. Add this mixture, while stirring, to the warm milk. Strain the custard and pour into the prepared cake shape.

Cover the shape with aluminum foil and place into a bigger pan. Pour boiling water into the bigger pan, until covering half-way the cake shape. Place the 2 pans into the oven. Bake for 30-40 minutes. You can check if the Flan is ready by sticking a knife into the middle and that is comes out clean.

Leave the Flan to cool down for at least 30 minutes at room temperature and preferably leave in the fridge for 1 night. Turn around on a serving dish and serve cold.

*Tip: If the caramel on the bottom of the cake shape has hardened, place the shape in a pan with hot water.




Dancing Chefs’ New Year resolutions

The year 2016 is the year of the revolution….. mmm we mean: resolution! After a lengthy discussion involving many margaritas and several shots of tequila the Dancing Chefs decided on the perfect resolutions to make Salsa and Salsa spicier, saucier and fun-filled. And who said New Year resolutions had to be solemn and serious?!?

The Dancing Chefs solemnly swear in 2016 to:

Greet every guest with a margarita and a big smile 

dancing chef haley with guest



Lead the Conga line

conga line leonique


Teach every chef how to salt their glass perfectly!

perfectly salted rim


Try the Hot Chef salsas, even though they make us cry!

We hit another SPICY record a 22-chili salsa Danci


Teach the perfect mushing technique: Press-and-roll….press-and-roll!


making salsa verde


Enjoy the ‘office’ view every day

cozumel sea view 1

Be goofy with our sister Dancing Chefs

DSC05066Dancing chef stephanie and Daphne1


Style up our salsa moves with an Olé!



Enjoy Salsa and Salsa like a little chef!

young chef with green salsa


Invite every chef onto the dance floor!

disabled chef dancing


Spread the salsa spirit around you and make sure to visit Salsa and Salsa again soon for a refresher class! Don’t forget to keep the Dancing Chefs to their promises! Olé!!!

LELA the Pig supports the nuns at Sanatorio Mazatlan

DSC04866During the month of October 2015, LELA the Pig turns towards the oldest hospital in Mazatlan “Sanatorio Mazatlan”. The hospital is run by 7 nuns, who take care of patients from all backgrounds.

DSC04865Sanatorio Mazatlan was the first hospital in Mazatlan, managed by the Sisters of the Holy Heart of Jesus since 1934.  This congregation of nuns originates from Guadalajara, Jalisco and their founder is the first Mexican saint Maria de Jesus Sacramentado. In those days there was no public hospital available and every patient was treated at Sanatorio Mazatlan. Until 1980 the first public hospital opened for the public and the work load for the nuns decreased.

Currently Sanatorio Mazatlan has 15 hospital beds, 2 operating rooms, intensive care and X-ray facilities. The nuns work day and night shifts, prepare food for patients, tend to spiritual needs and administrate the hospital. Sanatorio Mazatlan depends completely on donations and they do no receive any government funds. Patients without healthcare insurance are attended without charge.

Currently the Emergency Room is poorly equipped. Your generous donations will go towards purchasing two neccesary pieces of equipment for the work of the nuns. You’ll be proud to know that each $1USD-bill helps to buy a defibrillator and a heart monitor. These machines will help save hundreds of people’s lifes! LELA the Pig will reveal how much she collected at the end of October. You can follow her every move on or




“Tequila is the answer!”

Fiesta-fans, tequila lovers and sals-a-holics: it’s that time of the year again! September is the Patriotic Month of the year in Mexico, because of Independence Day on September 15th. Of course this the perfect excuse to host a Salsa party at home.  We’ve told you all about how to set up a Taco-party or Taquiza in a previous post. But now it’s time to expand your mixology skills beyond making a Margarita-on-the-rocks. As you can guess, the main ingredient of these cocktails is Mexico’s favorite drink……. Tequila!!!


This is probably the most famous way to drink tequila. Be careful though, because having more two might get you in some kind of trouble.


  • 1 shot Tequila
  • Lime, cut in 4 pieces
  • salt


Take 1/4 of the lime and hold it with your thumb and index finger. In the space of the hand where both previously mentioned join, put the salt. With the other hand hold the shot of tequila. To drink: lick the salt, shoot the tequila and bite the lime. Finally have somebody shake your head! Olé!!!

Salty Chihuahua

SaltyChihuahuaThis is the perfect cocktail for those looking for a low-calorie option. It’s a variation to the well-known Paloma cocktail that contains grape-fruit soda.


  • 1 shot tequila
  • 1/2 shot orange liqueur
  • 3 shots grapefruit juice
  • salt
  • grapefruit slice



Prepare your old-fashion glass by dipping into a plate with lime juice and then onto a plate with salt. Fill glass half full with ice cubes. Then add the tequila, orange liqueur and grapefruit juice and stir. Serve with a slice of grapefruit.


Tequila Sunset

tequila_sunriseThis is the sister of another famous tequila cocktail. It’s a refreshing drink for tropical summer nights or a celebration. However be aware that its sweet flavor might trick you and make sure to pace yourself.


  • 2 oz white tequila
  • 3 oz dark rum
  • 6 oz orange juice
  • splash of grenadine
  • orange slice


Fill a tall glass with ice and add the tequila and orange juice. Slowly pour in a splash of grenadine. To finish add the rum with a spoon, so it floats on top of the drink. Decorate your glass with a slice of orange or your favorite fruit.



This is a drink to be careful with for two reasons. It has tequila and coffee liqueur, which gives it heat. The preparation makes it perfect for those who like extreme experiences.

Cucaracha cocktailIngredients:

  • 1 1/2 oz tequila
  • 1 1/2 oz coffee liqueur


In a 4 oz glass add the coffee liqueur. Then pour SLOWLY the tequila to create layers and avoid mixing. Get matches, a brave volunteer and let the fun begin. Put a straw all the way to the bottom and finish it before it burns.






submarinoThis is another traditional drink with tequila. It’s lots of fun to prepare, but it’s not for the faint-hearted. The combination of tequila and beer might be too much for those who are not used to it.


  • 1 shot tequila
  • 1 Mexican beer

Take the shot glass with tequila. Hold the beer mug upside down and put the shot glass inside. Slowly turn around to not spill any tequila. Now gently serve a cold beer on top, so the tequila mixes poco-a-poco with the beer. Salud, dinero y mucho mucho amor!


“Spice up your holidays” – Travel hot spots in Mexico

The Dancing Chefs are passionate about cooking and dancing, but also love to travel. There are many beautiful cities and sites all over Mexico worth visiting. You will need several vacations to visit them all. Here are our favorites.

Barranca del Cobre



Ride the train, a horse, a bike – or just use your feel to explore the awsome canyon country.


Espirito Santo

isla espirito santo

For those who like to connect with nature, Espiritu Santo island is the perfect spot. Located in the Sea of Cortez, you can kayak with whale sharks around this island of azure inlets and pink cliffs.


Sunset overview of Playa Olas Altas, Mazatlan, Sinaloa, Mexico

Home-port of Salsa and Salsa, Mazatlan is much more than a cruise ship destination. The gorgeous colonial district is only a short walk from the 20-km long crescent sandy beach and the world’s longest boulevard.


Reserva Mariposa Monarca


The winter retreat for millions of highly colorful migrating butterflies of awesome stamina.

Puerto Escondido

puerto escondido

Super-relaxed coastal town for all tastes: surf, beaches, fishing, wildlife and nightlife.

Mexico City 

Overview of Mexico City

Highland megapolis, ancient Aztec capital, kaleidoscopic canvas of wonderful musea, culinary adventures and masked wrestlers.



Only 45 minutes from Mexico City you can explore a pair of mysterious and majestic pyramids, remnants of the mighty Aztec civilization.

From coast to coast, Mexico has lots to offer and it’s waiting for you to explore and enjoy!





“Chop, Chop!” – The 5 tastiest Pico de Gallo variations

pico de gallo1Mexico’s most famous salsa in any Mexican restaurant world-wide has to be ‘Pico de Gallo’. This fresh chopped Salsa contains diced Roma tomato, onion, serrano chili, cilantro, salt and lime juice. It’s a wonderful snack to serve with tortilla chips or a side-dish to spice up your meal.

Not everybody knows that Pico de Gallo is also known as ‘Salsa Mexicana’ in Mexico. The name doesn’t mean that the Salsa was made in Mexico. It actually refers to the colors of the Mexican flag: red, white and green!

Cinco de Mayo is the perfect occasion to create a Pico de Gallo. Instead of the traditional recipe the Dancing Chefs at Salsa and Salsa give you the 5 tastiest variations, so you can amaze your guests at the Salsa party!


Jicama Pico de Gallo 

pico de gallo jaliscoThe Dancing Chefs love to be experimental and healthy! The main ingredient is Jicama, a vegetable that is known for its refreshing taste.  The recipe comes from the state of Jalisco: the land of Tequila and mariachis. Enjoy!

½ kilo or 1 pound peeled jicama, cut in strips of 1×5 centimeters

2 peeled cucumbers, remove seeds, cut in strips of 1×5 centimeters

1 small cantaloupe melon cut in strips of 1×5 centimeters

¼ cup lime juice

2 fresh Serrano or jalapeño peppers, remove seeds and membranes, cut in very thin strips

½ tsp salt

1 tsp chili powder (optional)


Place all the ingredients, except the chili powder, in a bowl. Mix, taste and add salt if needed. To serve, place the Pico de Gallo in a flat dish and sprinkle the chili powder on top. Serve cold or at room temperature.


Habanero Pico de Gallo – ‘Xnipec’

xnipecThis fierce Pico de Gallo comes from the southern state of Yucatan and contains Habanero chili. This variety is not for the faint-hearted, but addictively tasty!

  • 2 big Roma tomatoes
  • Cilantro to taste
  • 1 chile habanero
  • ½ onion
  • Orange juice and vinegar
  • Sal to taste


Dice the tomatoes, onion and habanero chile finely. You might want to use gloves when cutting the habanero. Chop the cilantro and mix with the other ingredients. Add salt, orange juice and vinegar to taste. This salsa is used for grilled meat and fish.


Mango Pico de Gallo

pico de gallo mangoIf you like a sweet touch in your Pico de Gallo, try out this fruity version. It has mango, but you can use pine-apple too.

  • 4 Roma tomatoes
  • 1/2 onion
  • 1-2 serrano chilis
  • 1 ripe Mango
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon lime juice
  • Salt and pepper to tast

Dice all the ingredients in medium-sized pieces. Place together in a bowl and add the lime juice, olive oil, salt and pepper to taste. Cover and leave in the refrigerator for about 20 minutes before serving.


Nopal Pico de Gallo

nopal saladNopales are thick, oval, flat, modified stems of cactus plant, eaten as a vegetable. Its young tender pads known as ‘nopalitos’, are an important part of Mexican cuisine since ancient times. Their flavor is similar to French beans and nopales are a great addition to your meals.


  • 1 pound (500 gr) Nopal leaves, without spines
  • 2 big Roma tomatoes
  • Cilantro to taste
  • 1 chili Serrano
  • ½ onion
  • Lime juice
  • Sal to taste


Dice the nopal leaves in cubes. Place into a sauce pan with water and bring to a boil. Simmer for 5 minutes until the nopal leaves change color. Drain and place in a serving bowl to cool down. In the meanwhile dice the tomatoes, onion and chili finely. Chop the cilantro and mix with the other ingredients. Add salt and lime juice to taste. You can sprinkle ‘queso fresco’ or feta cheese on top. This salad is a great side dish and has only 50 calories per serving.


Melon – Bell pepper Pico de Gallo

cinco de mayoThis last variety of Pico de Gallo can be considered a ‘Salsa Fresca’, incorporating fruits and veggies. You can serve this salsa as a side-dish with roasted chicken.

  • 1 red bell pepper
  • 1 serrano chili
  • 1 cup diced melon (or mango)
  • Lime juice
  • Salt and pepper

Dice up the ingredients and place them together in a bowl.  If you want to make a milder salsa, make sure to remove the seeds of the serrano chili. Add the lime juice, salt and pepper to taste. Cover and refrigerate for about 20 minutes before serving.



10 Side-effects of Salsa and Salsa

The Dancing Chefs at Salsa and Salsa receive over ten thousand chefs per year in Cozumel, Mazatlan and Cabo San Lucas. We teach everybody the fun ins and outs of Salsa making and Salsa dancing, while enjoying free-flowing margaritas. But there are hidden side-effects behind this interactive cooking and dancing tour. And here they are…

  • You will not like margaritas made with Margarita mix

lime margarita

Back in the day that you had not been to Salsa and Salsa, you could enjoy any Margarita. But once you know what a REAL Margarita tastes like, the margarita-mix version won’t taste as good as it used to. The only solution is to buy a bottle of Tequila and Cointrea and some key limes and make your own Margaritas. TIP: teach the bartender how to make a REAL Margarita!


  • You won’t buy canned Salsas

salsa roja
Canned or bottled Salsas are more and more available outside Mexico. Even though it’s handy to open a can, you will find that these ketchup versions can’t compare to a Fiery Salsa Roja or Tangy Green Salsa made by the best Chef (YOU!).  TIP: roast your Salsa ingredients during the weekend and mush up your fresh Salsas in a matter of minutes.}

  • You will develop an addiction to spicy food

young chef making salsa

The world becomes a sad place without spicy food. Tabasco, Sriracha or Louisiana hot sauce become your faithful companions during meals. And the worst is that you will add more and more every time!


  • You will start speaking Spanish

salud CZM

“Holy Guacamole”… que pasa? After visiting Salsa and Salsa you will speak and toast like a true Mexican: Salud, Dinero y mucho mucho amor! And apart of Hola and Adios, you will use words like ‘Cerveza’, ‘Baño’ and ‘Gracias’.


  • You will recognize strange kinds of food

Mexican grocery items

The vegetable section of your Mexican grocery store will all of a sudden look familiar. Green tomatoes, serranos, jicama and guavas will become part of your daily diet and you will know the difference between cilantro and flat-leaf parsley.

  • Your body will move in strange ways

Salsa moves

Gone are the days that you could listen to Salsa music and stand still. Now you will find your body moving in ways you previously thought impossible and you will mumble to yourself….Sea-side, bar-side……


  • You will shout out  ‘Olé’ on unexpected moments

Even your well-behaved self will relapse into ‘Salsa-mode’ occasionally and you will blurt out ‘Olé’. This will cause your family, friends or co-workers to wonder what’s going on and you will have to explain the reason why.


  • You will know what a ‘molcajete’ is and use it too

making salsa verde

The Mexican mortar (a.k.a. ‘Molcajete’: Mohl-cah-HE-te) will become a tool you recognize and use. The secret to a perfect Salsa lies in the Mexican mortar and mushing skills of the chef. TIP: Use the press-and-roll for a perfect consistency  😉

  • You will brag about your Salsas

the BEST Salsa

You will display a certain level of arrogance regarding your Salsas. You will disdain any bottled Salsas served at parties and argue with other chefs about how to make the BEST Salsa: more/less cilantro, more/less salt, more/less lime, roasted/boiled ingredients, etc.


  • You will go back to Mexico for a refresher class at Salsa and Salsa

welcome back Dancing Chefs

This last danger is imminent from the moment you leave the Salsa and Salsa tour. You will look at the photos from your holidays in Mexico and automatically book your next cruise or stay. Even up to 1 1/2 years ahead of time. TIP: to mitigate these symptoms, take your recipe sheet and dice up a Pico de Gallo.


Blog at

Up ↑