“Tequila is the answer!”

Fiesta-fans, tequila lovers and sals-a-holics: it’s that time of the year again! September is the Patriotic Month of the year in Mexico, because of Independence Day on September 15th. Of course this the perfect excuse to host a Salsa party at home.  We’ve told you all about how to set up a Taco-party or Taquiza in a previous post. But now it’s time to expand your mixology skills beyond making a Margarita-on-the-rocks. As you can guess, the main ingredient of these cocktails is Mexico’s favorite drink……. Tequila!!!


This is probably the most famous way to drink tequila. Be careful though, because having more two might get you in some kind of trouble.


  • 1 shot Tequila
  • Lime, cut in 4 pieces
  • salt


Take 1/4 of the lime and hold it with your thumb and index finger. In the space of the hand where both previously mentioned join, put the salt. With the other hand hold the shot of tequila. To drink: lick the salt, shoot the tequila and bite the lime. Finally have somebody shake your head! Olé!!!

Salty Chihuahua

SaltyChihuahuaThis is the perfect cocktail for those looking for a low-calorie option. It’s a variation to the well-known Paloma cocktail that contains grape-fruit soda.


  • 1 shot tequila
  • 1/2 shot orange liqueur
  • 3 shots grapefruit juice
  • salt
  • grapefruit slice



Prepare your old-fashion glass by dipping into a plate with lime juice and then onto a plate with salt. Fill glass half full with ice cubes. Then add the tequila, orange liqueur and grapefruit juice and stir. Serve with a slice of grapefruit.


Tequila Sunset

tequila_sunriseThis is the sister of another famous tequila cocktail. It’s a refreshing drink for tropical summer nights or a celebration. However be aware that its sweet flavor might trick you and make sure to pace yourself.


  • 2 oz white tequila
  • 3 oz dark rum
  • 6 oz orange juice
  • splash of grenadine
  • orange slice


Fill a tall glass with ice and add the tequila and orange juice. Slowly pour in a splash of grenadine. To finish add the rum with a spoon, so it floats on top of the drink. Decorate your glass with a slice of orange or your favorite fruit.



This is a drink to be careful with for two reasons. It has tequila and coffee liqueur, which gives it heat. The preparation makes it perfect for those who like extreme experiences.

Cucaracha cocktailIngredients:

  • 1 1/2 oz tequila
  • 1 1/2 oz coffee liqueur


In a 4 oz glass add the coffee liqueur. Then pour SLOWLY the tequila to create layers and avoid mixing. Get matches, a brave volunteer and let the fun begin. Put a straw all the way to the bottom and finish it before it burns.






submarinoThis is another traditional drink with tequila. It’s lots of fun to prepare, but it’s not for the faint-hearted. The combination of tequila and beer might be too much for those who are not used to it.


  • 1 shot tequila
  • 1 Mexican beer

Take the shot glass with tequila. Hold the beer mug upside down and put the shot glass inside. Slowly turn around to not spill any tequila. Now gently serve a cold beer on top, so the tequila mixes poco-a-poco with the beer. Salud, dinero y mucho mucho amor!



The Dancing Chefs show off their tools!

dancing chef amandaMexico’s most patriotic month of the year has started.  So it’s time to dust off your big ‘Sombrero’, take out the tequila and get ready Mexico’s Independence Day on September 15th.  But before you start gulping down those shots of tequila, you should have at least a solid base of home-made Mexican food in your stomach. You know…. Just in case!

When you walk into a kitchen in Mexico, you will find several cooking tools that might look unfamiliar to you. However to make the best Mexican food, you need the best tools. To help you figure out what to use, here’s an easy guide from the Dancing Chefs:




We’re going to start off easy. If you have been at Salsa and Salsa, you have hands-on experience with the Mexican mortar. It’s made from lava stone or clay and it is used to grind spices and ingredients to make Salsa!




You might have seen this utensil in hole-in-the-wall restaurants. It’s a round baking sheet or griddle, made of stoneware or iron. The Comal is heated on the stove top or directly on a fire to bake or reheat tortillas. It’s quite an art to bake tortillas and not burn your fingers when you have to turn them over! If you can’t find a Comal, you can use a dry skillet instead.




This traditional earthenware casserole only has been glazed on the inside. The Cazuela is perfect to make Moles and stews, because it heats evenly and stay warm for a long time. When you buy a new Cazuela you have to make it ready for use. To do this, rub the inside with a fresh clove of garlic, fill the cazuela with cold water and leave to boil dry. Repeat this process several times and then rinse with some water and soap.




The name of this tool literally means ‘hand mill’. It is a wooden, carved whisk to make hot chocolate. Mexican chocolate is a mixture of ground cocoa, sugar and cinnamon, pressed together into chocolate bars. The loose wooden rings at the top make sure that the hot chocolate become nice and foamy. To use the Molinillo you have to hold it between two hands and twist back and forth to make the whisk movement.

metate y mano




Metate y Mano:

This ancient tool is made of lava stone and has a wide rolling pin, with which you grind corn, chilies, cocoa beans and other ingredients. Indigenous chefs kneel on the ground,

true to tradition and roll the round Mano over the Metate. The ground ingredients are collected on the lower end of the Metate.

The flavors of Mexico

This month we celebrate Mexico’s Independence Day on September 15th. The whole month you can see street vendors selling all kinds of goods with the red-white-green colors of the national flag. Mexicans are very proud of their country, culture and cuisine.

Even though I wasn’t born in Mexico, I feel like this wonderful country has adopted me. The past eight years that I have lived here, I have been lucky enough to visit many different regions. Most foreign visitors head towards one of the many beach destinations, but there’s much more to see, hear, smell and taste! Join me on my travel through Mexico.


Taxco, 160 km southwest of Mexico City, has ridden waves of boom and bust associated with the fantastically wealthy silver deposits discovered here in the 16th century and then repeatedly until the early 20th century. With its silver now almost gone, the town has fallen back on tourism to sustain it. The town is scattered down a precipitous hillside surrounded by dramatic mountains and cliffs, its perfectly preserved architecture and the twin belfries of its baroque masterpiece, Parroquia Santa Prisca, make for one of the most spectacular views anywhere in the central highlands.


Morelia is the coolest place you’ve ever been. The colonial heart of the city is so well preserved that it was declared a Unesco World Heritage site in 1991. The cathedral is no just gorgeous. It’s inspirational, especially when the working organ with 4600 pipes is played. Sixteenth and 17th century stone buildings, baroque facades and archways line the narrow downtown streets, and are home to museums, hotels, restaurants, chocolaterias, sidewalk cafés, a popular university and cheap and tasty taquerias.


East of Mexico City lies the gorgeous colonial city of Puebla. Mexico’s fifth largest city, Puebla is the dominant regional centre and big tourist draw for its cathedral, culinary attractions and well-preserved history. The surroundings of Puebla are predominantly rural, with stunning views on the incredible Popocatépetl and Iztaccíhuatl volcanoes.

Puebla is rightly famous for its gastronomy  (and especially for moles poblanos, the classic spicy sauce containing chiles, chocolate, sesame seed and more). If you’re visiting Puebla you must try this, to have really experienced the city.


Oaxaca is the heart of a region whose highly creative populace produces the country’s finest range of crafts and some of its most exciting contemporary art. Artists and artisans alike are inspired by the state’s deep-rooted indigenous tradtions and by its bright southern light. The city is surrounded by fascinating archaeological sites and by colourfully traditional villages and small towns.

Oaxaca has its own spicy take on Mexican cuisine, based on its famous seven moles (sauces usually served over chicken or pork). Other local specialties include tasajo (slices of pounded beef), tlayudas (big crisp tortillas with varied toppings, sometimes labeled ‘Oaxacan pizza’), quesillo (stringy cheese) and chapulines ( grasshoppers! – usually fried with chili powder, onion and garlic). When you are in Oaxaca, you have to try this unusual delicacy. Because any serious foodie should be brave and try whatever’s cooking!

I hope you’ve enjoyed this glimpse into the history, food and culture of Mexico. This large country has both temperate and tropical zones, reaches 5km into the sky, stretches 100,000 km along its coasts. Mexico is what you make of it…. open your eyes the huge variety of options for human adventure that it has to offer.


Dancing Chef Maaike

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