What’s in a guac? The Dancing Chefs’ favorite guacamole recipes

Guacamole is an avocado-based dip or salad first created by the Aztecs in Mexico. It’s so popular that it has passed beyond Mexican borders and has also become part of American cuisine as a dip or side dish. Avocado is incredibly nutritious, because it contains Vitamin B6, C and E as well as healthy fats. This makes you feel satiated without adding too many calories. Add new flavors to your kitchen: pull out the Salsa and Salsa recipe sheet or try one of these tasty recipes.

DANCING CHEF TIP: When you make a guacamole, make sure to leave the seed of the avocado in the serving bowl. This will help that the guacamole doesn’t turn brown. You can also add a couple drops of lime juice.

Classic Guacamole1

  • 2 ripe avocados
  • ¼ cup diced Roma tomatoes
  • ½ tbsp. diced Serrano chili
  • ¼ cup onion, diced
  • 2 tbsp. cilantro, chopped
  • Salt and lime to taste

Score the avocado all around with a knife and open. Remove the seed. Take out the pulp with a spoon and mush in molcajete. Add the tomato, chili, onion and cilantro and mush together. Add salt and a few drops of lime juice to taste.

Tropical Guacamole

2

  • 1 ripe mango, peeled and diced in cubes
  • ¼ cup jicama or radish, peeled and diced in cubes
  • ¼ cup red onion, diced finely
  • ¼ tsp garlic, peeled and diced finely
  • 2 tbsp. lime juice
  • 2 ripe avocados
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Optional: 2 tbsp. pomegranate seeds

In a bowl, combine the mango, jicama, onion, garlic, lime juice, salt and pepper. Set aside. Score the avocados all around, down to the seed. Twist and open. Remove the seed and take out the avocado. Mush in a molcajete until softened and add the other ingredients. Taste and adjust the salt.

You can decorate the guacamole with pomegranate seeds and serve with tortilla chips.

 

Crunchy Guacamole

  • 2 ripe avocados
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp garlic, finely diced
  • ½ cup guayabas (guavas), diced without seeds
  • ½ cup peach, diced without seed
  • 1 cup cucumber, peeled and diced without seeds
  • ¼ cup onion, finely diced
  • ¼ cup cilantro, diced

Remove the pulp from the avocado with a spoon. Mush the avocado in the molcajete with the salt and garlic. Add the guayaba, peach, cucumber, onion and cilantro. Mix well and season to taste.

 

Poblano chili Guacamole

  • 2 Poblano chilies
  • 2 ripe avocados
  • ½ cup onion, finely diced
  • ½ cup cilantro, diced
  • 2 Roma tomatoes, diced
  • Lime and salt to taste

Open the avocados and place the pulp into a molcajete. Mush into a paste, add a couple drops of lime juice and set aside.

Roast the Poblano chilies over an open flame until charred. You can also roast them in the oven for 25 minutes. Remove the skin and seeds and cut into small strips. Roast the tomatoes in the same way; remove skin and seeds and dice into small pieces. Add the roasted Poblano chilies, roasted tomatoes, onion and cilantro to the molcajete and incorporate with the avocado. Season to taste.

 

‘Mexicanissimo’ Guacamole

4

 

  • 2 ripe avocados
  • 2 Guajillo chilies, seeds removed, cut in strips
  • 3 strips bacon
  • 1 cup Nopales (cactus leaves), cooked and diced
  • 1 cup onion, diced
  • ½ cup cilantro, diced
  • Salt and lime to taste

 

Cut the bacon into small strips and fry until crunchy. Set aside. Heat oil in a skillet and fry the Chile Guajillo strips for 30 seconds. Set aside to cool down.

Open the avocados and place the pulp into a molcajete. Mush well and add a few drops of lime juice. Add the bacon strips, Guajillo chili, Nopales, onion and cilantro to the molcajete and mix well. You can adjust the seasoning with salt and lime.

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From the mountains to the sea: the journey of Dancing Chef Haley

dancing chef HaleyI have always thought of life as an adventure, so when I decided I wanted to do something outside of what most 19 year old college students do, everyone that knows me was not surprised. This summer I decided I wanted to do something different, so I moved to the island of Cozumel Mexico and become a Dancing Chef for the famous Salsa and Salsa tour (aka best summer job ever).

I was born in the mountainous state of Colorado. I get my adventurous side from my family, because when I was in 2nd grade, seeking adventure, my family decided to move to the sunny island of Cozumel, Mexico. I attended a bilingual school, so I am fluent in both English and Spanish. I lived in various parts of Mexico for 10 years including Cancun & Mazatlán. Growing up in a different culture gave me an exclusive view on life and I am always eager to meet people from all over the world and hear their unique stories. I recently moved back to the United States for college. I am currently double majoring in Restaurant, Food, Beverage Management and International Hotel & Tourism Management.

dancing chef haley with guestWhen I joined the Salsa & Salsa team this summer in Cozumel as a dancing chef, I didn’t know what to expect. I had done my research on the show and the company before moving down to the island for 3 months, and from what I could tell, everyone who had ever attended the Salsa & Salsa show had loved it so I was excited. This job was not only a fun summer job where I could live the island life in paradise, but also a learning experience. Customer service is a huge part of the hospitality industry and working for Salsa and Salsa, I got the hands on experience that cannot be taught at school.

My first day meeting my fellow coworkers, I realized I was walking into a family. From day one, they made me feel like I belonged. How many people can say that after their first day in a new job, in a different country and speaking a foreign language?! I felt like the luckiest girl in the world. I realized working as a dancing chef that you need to treat every day as a new experience because you never know who will walk through your door.

Working for Salsa & Salsa this summer not only taught me the important things in the hospitality industry, such as: working on my personal skills with clients, learning how to do inventory, helping out in the kitchen and seeing what it actually takes to run Salsa& Salsa on a business standpoint, but also fun things like:

  1. I can’t Salsa dance to save my life, but I will have a blast trying and making up new moves of my own with my awesome dance partners.
  2. People can get very creative and involve a lot of “Styling”, as us dancing chefs like to call it when it comes to salsa dancing
  3. You truly can change anyone’s day with a smile (and maybe a couple margaritas 😉 )
  4. Tomatillos are actually from the goose berry family
  5. I will never go back to the old red roma tomato, white onion guacamole ever again

dancing chef haley with group photoThis summer has definitely been an amazing experience not only as being a stepping stone in my career and future, but learning a lot about myself as well. You never know what might happen, and even though you might be given the same show day in and day out, every day and every person walking through our gate is different, and I love the diversity. “The biggest adventure you can ever take is to live the life of your dreams.” – Oprah Winfrey

Con mucho mucho amor,

Dancing Chef at heart, Haley Saul.

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